About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 3
FBC 3
CNN 2
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
to cut. it was not a serious proposal. >> the president may have the upper hand because the fiscal cliff tops allow him to back the opposition into a corner by framing this as republicans raising taxes. >> if congress does nothing, every family in america will see theiincome taxes automatically go up on january 1st. that is sort of like a lump of coal you get for christmas. >> congressional democrats operating like they don't have to compromise on spending or taxes. >> elections have consequences. the president campaigned, made it very clear. made very clear that he was supporting ta cuts for the middle-class, that he wanted the expiration of the tax cuts for the high end. >> very little progress among the inside player so far, the president plans to keep pressuring republicans from the outside. meeting with the nation's governors on tuesday and then addressing the business roundtable on wednesday. lou: thank you. ed henry, fox news chief white house correspondent. joining me now, a pulitzer prize-winning journalist, campaign strategists, former reagan political director of, veteraran de
parties taking to the airwaves this weekend, trying to blame each other over the fiscal cliff talk. this is all happening less than a month until accommodation of spending cuts and tax hikes kicks in. right now, it seems like both sides are moving further apart from the deal. here is house speaker john boehner and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more
of running the original picture. >>> turning to other offensive things. the fiscal cliff, which is beginning to be one of the great crashing bores in the history of world publics. you're three bright americans all involved in politics, in some way or form. the rest of the world finds this, not only laughable, but almost dangerously laughable, that year in, year out, it seems, washington goes to these cliffs. plays games, doesn't get deals done. what the hell is wrong with american politicians? alan dershowitz, what is wrong with american politicians? why can't they get around a table and negotiate properly? >> because all they care about is getting elected. nobody cares deeply about the future of america. we have america to urge with the israelis to negotiate with the palestinians. urging to negotiate with everyone but us in washington. we don't negotiate. our parties are so extreme. i'm a relatively wealthy person. i want to be paying more taxes. i want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but
a fallback plan for the so called "fiscal cliff", which includes extending tax cuts for the middle class and resuming a fight over spending and taxes for the wealthy later. meanwhile, going overseas, nato makes a move on the turkish border with syria. military officials deny preparations for military intervention. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to so
. there are only 23 days left before we dive over the fiscal cliff. republicans say we can avoid it. the president says he has a different plan. the the president doesn't want an agreement or compromise, he wants to get his way. >> what happens if the president does get his way? we'll explore that. >> hello i'm mike in for dave. apparently such a thing as a free lunch. 30 million dollars of your tax dollars were supposed to help kids affected by superstorm sandy. instead all of new york's kids are eating for free. >> clayton: do you think this 90-year-old statue is offensive? take a look at the screen, offensive. a man basically standing on a woman. some people's rights groups do and they're trying to get rid of it. we'll explain. "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ >> straighten up your socks, mike. >> pulling up the socks, a long four hours. >> alisyn: and get dressed before the show? >> hoyt hoist them up. mike jerrick is in for dave. >> hi, everybody. >> clayton: and get the heisman trophy winner and dave was so jealous, he didn't get so see john am i manziel. >> and freshman. >> alisyn: a
on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republicans and democrats can agree on, and i hope we can get back to that point. a lot of work need to be done in the republican party for us to get there. >> eliot: your point is so well taken. there should be no disagreement about extending rights to those with disabilities. this is not a partisan issue. it has not been historically a partisan issue. whom will you call? where will you begin when you go and reach out to the republican party and say guys, go back to your roots. you just lost an election because of the narrowness of your vision. expand it. who will you talk to? >> you know what? i will talk to everyone and anyone who will listen. we work he very closely with former senator dole, and i couldn't believe as he was sitting there in the
. thank you for the update. >> absolutely. >> in a few minutes, discussion about the fiscal cliff and how it would affect national security. in a little less than an hour, more about the fiscal cliff with republican representative tom cole from oklahoma. then the head of fema testified on capitol hill about the government's response hurricane sandy. later, we will re-air the senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. >> and tomorrow morning's "washington journal", peter welch, on the latest development of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterso
on this fiscal cliff which has automatic tax hikes and spending cuts as of january one, they are trying to avert that. he says any deal on this must include an end to the debt ceiling all together. he wants complete power to raise the country's limit by himself. he doesn't want to have to get congressional approval. that is a demand stirring strong response from republicans today. >> the on way we ever cut spending is by using the debate over the debt limit to do it. now the president wants to remove that spur to cut all together. of course, it gets in the way of his spending plans. i can assure you it one happen. the american people want washington to get spending under control and the debt limit is the best tool we have to make the president take that demand seriously. the american people want us to fight to cut spending. it's a fight they deserve and a fight we are happy to have. >> joining me now, simon rosenberg. and mark theisen. guys, welcome. simon, let me start with you on this. we did have some democrats come on the show and say no, the president doesn't get to just decide when to rais
than not. >> all right. well, with 25 days to go until the year-end fiscal cliff deadline, president obama and speaker boehner spoke on the phone yesterday for the first time in days. both men agreed not to publicly characterize how the conversation went. but the stalemate in negotiations entered new territory yesterday with treasury secretary tim geithner suggesting the white house is ready to go off the cliff if republicans refuse to raise taxes on the 2%. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during de
crisis? has the road to the fiscal cliff been a good thing for america? our next guest says yes. he takes a counter intuitive approach to almost everything, and has been financially very successful as a result. his most famous book, "the black swan" was a "the new york times" best seller about events that are essentially outliers, black swans. some credit that book with redistricting the 2008 economic crisis. he has a new book out called "anti-fragile." let's start with a couple of examples so people understand what you mean. you're saying some systems, you apply this in an amazingly comprehensive way to all of life, but some political systems are fragile and some are anti-fragile. for example, you say switserland is anti-fragile. why? >> fragile is something that doesn't like disorder. doesn't like volatility, variability, if something happens, it breaks. probably very fragile place needless to say would be saudi arabia or before arab spring was egypt, same regime for 40 years. something robust doesn't break, doesn't care. something anti-fragile never wastes, has political volatility, ne
dealing with hurricane sandy. we're dealing with the fiscal cliff. we do not have enough money for our own country. >> we need to understand that the fiscal cliff and the climate is not associated. the climate is not waiting for us. developed countries need to make some serious shifting of priorities and they need to allocate what is needed to solve the climate issue. >> anjali appadurai, to a student at the college of the atlantic. she addressed the durban u.n. climate summit. this year, has been allowed back in for the last week, to participate. when we come back, we have an analyst talking about the kocht opus. >> singfortheclimate.com. today at the doha summit, we went to a news conference were major climate negotiator from belgium and the european union sang the song as well. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. we are broadcasting from the 18th u.n. climate change summit. i'm amy goodman. the billionaire brothers charles and david koch are known for funneling vast amounts of money into republican campaigns. the u.s. is accused of blocking progress here
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
-span.org. 8:00 eastern on c-span, negotiations on the fiscal cliff. we'll hear from harry reid and mitch mcconnell. c-span3, the impact of hurricnae ane sandy. a bipartisan group of senators spoke to reporters today about the civil war in syria and the potential use of force against the regime of bashar al-assad. >> good afternoon. i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator lieberman, senator gramm. -- graham. we are deeply disturbed by reports that bashar al-assad may have lionized -- weaponized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepare them for use in aerial bombs. these reports also suggest that his forces are awaiting orders to use these weapons. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an eminent use of weapons of mass destruction and syria, and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close, and we may instead be left with an awful and it's very difficult decision. whether to continue on the sidelines and hope that a man who has slaughtered n
about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act in laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 elections. >> why a writers institute? >> i think it is something that is very important. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are a key to our imagination, our capacity to imagine things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps soma, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that captures the human. . the >> joint american history television and c-span local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes of a letter lives of new york city. >> next you hear from bradley manning's attorney about his case. he is accused of leaking classified documents to the web site wikileaks. the trial is under way in maryland. he testified earlier on the conditions he has experienced since being detained in iraq. this is half an hour. >> i really appreciate the turn out here, especially the turn of by the press. thank you for that. i have not participated in any public event for today. i also avoid any interviews with th
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)